Ganesha Cookstove Project

Lab Testing

Testing in the Laboratory

 Ganesha cookstove during formal third-party testing, with StoveTec pot from  Aprovecho

Ganesha cookstove during formal third-party testing, with StoveTec pot from Aprovecho

All testing of our cookstoves has been conducted at RTKC Nepal, using internationally-recognized protocols.

Tests were conducted in several different ways. Here are some key results:

  • Maximum firepower: 10.6 kW (36,000 Btus). For comparison, a standard gas burner produces 9,000 to 11,000 Btus.
  • Fastest cooking: 12 minutes to boil 5 liters (1.3 gallons) of water
  • Able to burn dried cow dung at high firepower with no other biomass needed to maintain the fire
  • Efficiency as high as 34%, and emissions on par with market-leading stoves (see below for details)

Comparative test results are shown below, using the 5-tier system (0 worst, 4 best) established under cookstove testing protocols. We have included a small sample of competing stoves (the Envirofit M-5000 is one of the most widely distributed clean cookstoves worldwide). The Level Market provides an excellent overview of cookstoves available today.

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Original testing data can be found at the following links:

Ganesha Stove: maximum firepower test, complete test
Envirofit M-5000 (natural-draft rocket stove)
Envirofit Econofire (natural-draft rocket stove)
EcoZoom Relief (natural-draft rocket stove)
CRT/N RSMS2 (natural-draft rocket stove produced for use in Nepal)
ACE 1 (forced-draft pellet gasifier stove)

We included the ACE 1 stove in this table to show both ends of the spectrum, from the $12 Ganesha stove to the $100 ACE 1. While the Ganesha stove and the other 4 cookstoves above are natural-draft stoves designed to burn wood and other biomass, the ACE 1 is a forced-draft (fan-powered) stove designed to burn pellets made of wood or agricultural waste. While the performance of this stove is high under testing protocols, a recent study raised the concern that forced-draft stoves can generate tiny particles that travel deep into the lungs, which is implicated in lung cancer. 

 

 First-generation Ganesha stove in use in Brabal, Nepal

First-generation Ganesha stove in use in Brabal, Nepal

 Metal woodstove common in the Langtang region of Nepal

Metal woodstove common in the Langtang region of Nepal

 Second-generation prototype in use in Solukhumbu, Nepal

Second-generation prototype in use in Solukhumbu, Nepal

 Second protoype of Ganesha stove, after 16 months of continuous use.

Second protoype of Ganesha stove, after 16 months of continuous use.

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